Professor, Former US Secretary of Labor
Contributor's Links: RobertReich.org

Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies, was Secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration. Time Magazine named him one of the ten most effective cabinet secretaries of the ... more

ALL CONTRIBUTIONS

Why College Is Necessary But Gets You Nowhere
People with college degrees continue to earn far more than people without them. And that college “premium” keeps rising.
Read
EC And Now The Richest .01 Percent
The richest Americans hold more of the nation’s wealth than they have in almost a century. What do they spend it on? As you might expect, personal jets, giant yachts, works of art, and luxury penthouses.
Read
The Choice Of The Century
If you want a single reason for why Democrats lost big on Election Day 2014 it’s this: Median household income continues to drop. This is the first “recovery” in memory when this has happened.
Read
Empathy Deficit Disorder
A minimum-wage job is no one’s version of the American dream.
Read
Why Government Spends More Per Pupil At Elite Private Universities Than At Public Universities
So what justifies the high per-student government subsidies at the elite private universities, and the low per-student subsidies in public universities?
Read
Why We Allow Big Pharma To Rip Us Off
According to a new federal database put online last week, pharmaceutical companies and device makers paid doctors some $380 million in speaking and consulting fees over a five-month period in 2013.
Read

STOCKS I FOLLOW

GLD SPDR Gold Trust ETF
QQQ PowerShares QQQ Trust Series 1
SPY SPDR S&P 500

TWEETS

PERSONAL BLOG

Latest Posts

Work Experience

Professor of Public Policy
University of California at Berkeley
January 2006 - Present (16 years 2 months)
University Professor
Brandeis University
January 1997 - December 2005 (9 years 1 month)
Secretary of Labor
United States of America
January 1993 - January 1997 (4 years 1 month)

Education

Yale Law School
J.D.
/ 1973
J.D., 1973 (Law Review)
Oxford University
M.A.
/ 1970
M.A. 1970 (Rhodes Scholar)
Dartmouth College
B.A.
/ 1968
B.A. 1968 (summa cum laude)

Publications

Beyond Outrage
Robert Reich
Vintage
09/04/2012
America’s economy and democracy are working for the benefit of an ever-fewer privileged and powerful people. But rather than just complain about it or give up on the system, we must join together and make it work for all of us. In this timely book, Robert B. Reich argues that nothing good happens in Washington unless citizens are energized and organized to make sure Washington acts in the public good. The first step is to see the big picture. Beyond Outrage connects the dots, showing why the increasing share of income and wealth going to the top has hobbled jobs and growth for everyone else, undermining our democracy; caused Americans to become increasingly cynical about public life; and turned many Americans against one another.
Aftershock: The Next Economy and America's Future
Robert Reich
Knopf
09/21/2010
A brilliant new reading of the economic crisis—and a plan for dealing with the challenge of its aftermath—by one of our most trenchant and informed experts. When the nation’s economy foundered in 2008, blame was directed almost universally at Wall Street. But Robert B. Reich suggests a different reason for the meltdown, and for a perilous road ahead. He argues that the real problem is structural: it lies in the increasing concentration of income and wealth at the top, and in a middle class that has had to go deeply into debt to maintain a decent standard of living.
Supercapitalism: The Transformation of Business, Democracy, and Everyday Life
Robert Reich
Vintage
09/09/2008
From one of America's foremost economic and political thinkers comes a vital analysis of our new hypercompetitive and turbo-charged global economy and the effect it is having on American democracy. With his customary wit and insight, Reich shows how widening inequality of income and wealth, heightened job insecurity, and corporate corruption are merely the logical results of a system in which politicians are more beholden to the influence of business lobbyists than to the voters who elected them. Powerful and thought-provoking, Supercapitalism argues that a clear separation of politics and capitalism will foster an enviroment in which both business and government thrive, by putting capitalism in the service of democracy, and not the other way around.